As we have written before, alternate dispute resolution is a favored way to resolve divorce matters, whether it be mediation or binding arbitration.  One reason that people choose the arbitration route is that they are avoiding the courts that have mandatory reporting of tax issues (failure to report all of the income, etc.).  Another reason,

Last week, I blogged on the  A.J.V. v. M.M.V.  case, specifically, regarding the retroactive application of a savings component.  As noted in the post, there was an interesting treatment of deferred compensation in the case.

Specifically, the husband received RSUs as part of his annual compensation which serially vested over 3 years.  In this case,

While the issue of savings being a component of alimony has been around for decades, since the Lombardi case in 2016 (which we previously blogged about), the issue of a savings component, especially where parties live reasonably frugally, but save a lot, have become more of a front burner issue.

In Lombardi, the

In January 2020, the Appellate Division considered an important question: how should a judge assess a party’s request to appear at a trial and present testimony by way of video transmission? The timing of this consideration could not be more fitting considering the challenges presented by a global pandemic, which would shift the future of

I have seen this more than one time in my career.  One party (or his/her family members) really wants there to be a prenuptial agreement but, either due to lack of time, fear/cowardice, not having your act together, or any other reason, the prenup never gets done.  Some I have seen signed just after the

There used to be a family judge, who, with his law clerk, spent a lot of time on Google, looking up property records, Zillow “values” and other information regarding the parties and their property.  While most of the time it proved harmless, I was always concerned about the court relying on evidence that was not

A lot of people believe that COVID has caused divorce cases to drag and the legal system to be ground to a halt – or at least, to lag behind.  While that is certainly the case in some counties and more particularly, with some Judges, for the most part, the courts are acting efficiently, and

Many people think that palimony is just alimony with a “P” and that the mere existence of a long term unmarried relationship, where the people live together, is enough to convey some right of support.  Having argued the landmark Maeker v. Ross case regarding palimony in the New Jersey Supreme Court, I have made clear