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NJ Family Legal Blog Pertinent Information As It Relates To New Jersey Family Laws

Tag Archives: Hunterdon County Divorce Attorneys

LESSONS IN ADOLESCENT CUSTODY AND CO-PARENTING FROM THE TEENAGE BRAIN

Posted in Custody, Practice Issues, Visitation/Parenting Time

Moody; impulsive; reckless; brash; exasperating. No, I am not describing Charlie Sheen circa 2011.  I am talking about teenagers. Indeed, Aristotle described these elusive creatures as “heated by nature as drunken men by wine” – and that’s on a normal day.  But rest assured Mom and Dad – your teenager is not trying make your life miserable… Continue Reading

HOW MEN AND WOMEN CAN “LEAN IN” TO DIVORCE

Posted in Divorce

In the past year, you have probably heard this term about a thousand times; especially if you’re a woman.  The book that started it all, “Lean In” by Sheryl Sandberg, focused on encouraging women to pursue their ambitions in a male-dominated world. In the book, Sandberg offered practical advice to women in the workplace with… Continue Reading

IF YOU THINK A PARENTING COORDINATOR SOUNDS LIKE JUST THE SOLUTION TO ASSIST PARENTS WHO HAVE A FINAL RESTRAINING ORDER – THINK AGAIN

Posted in Divorce, Domestic Violence, Interspousal Agreements, Practice Issues, Visitation/Parenting Time

In the unpublished (non-precedential) recent case of N.G. v. N.B.G., the Appellate Court declined to enforce a provision in the parties’ Marital Settlement Agreement that permitted the parties to retain a Parenting Coordinator to resolve co-parenting issues, due to the existence of a Final Restraining Order  (I note that the FRO was in existence at… Continue Reading

DO BABY GIRLS CAUSE DIVORCE? ECONOMIC DATA SUGGESTS THEY MIGHT

Posted in Divorce

Sorry for the inflammatory title.  But it’s true.  Well, at least recent data examined by Enrico Moretti, a Professor of Economics at University of California, Berkely, suggests it is. Dr. Moretti recently appeared on a Freakonomics Radio Podcast to present his conclusions. The question posed by one listener was rather simple: “In marriages where a… Continue Reading

TERMINATING ALIMONY FOR TERMINALLY ILL PATIENT – EASY, RIGHT? WRONG.

Posted in Alimony, Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships, Counsel Fee Awards, Divorce, Interspousal Agreements, Modification, Other, Property Settlement Agreements

Recently I lost a dear client and friend, Bill*, after his long battle with brain cancer.  Bill was a man with a kind-hearted spirit and a gentle disposition – one of those “really nice guys” that you just wanted to bend over backwards to help. While Bill was fortunate enough to spend his last days… Continue Reading

A SAVINGS COMPONENT IN CHILD SUPPORT?

Posted in Child Support

I have previously blogged about the permanent alimony , imputation and lifestyle aspects of the Gnall case decided by the Appellate Division last week.  The last interesting aspect of Gnall was the treatment of child support in an over guidelines case, specifically, college savings. *Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net Remember from the prior posts that in this case, the… Continue Reading

Divorce in Your Sixties – Is Permanent Alimony the Right Result?

Posted in Alimony

Wikipedia defines grey divorce as a "term referring to the demographic trend of an increasing divorce rate for older ("grey-haired") couples in long-lasting marriages."  Now while "grey divorces" of a short or mid length marriage provide challenges for a divorce attorney, many believe that divorces of long term marriages are easy.  Just whack up the assets 50-50, agree… Continue Reading

Just Because An Adult Child Lives at Home, Does Not Mean Child Support Continues

Posted in Child Support, College, Custody, Divorce, Interspousal Agreements, Modification

The number of college graduates living with their parents has almost doubled since 2007. Currently, over 45% of 26-year-olds live at home with their parents. The figures highlight the difficulty that many young Americans have had in establishing careers following the longest recession this country has faced since the Great Depression. Some children, although employed,… Continue Reading

The Discovery Dance

Posted in Practice Issues

Some times, the most basic part of the case, discovery, can often be the most frustrating part.  In most cases, some amount of discovery is needed to do the due diligence necessary to bring a matter to its conclusion with some sense of comfort that the issues have been adequately addressed.  In complex cases, especially… Continue Reading

Custody – Back to Basics

Posted in Custody, Visitation/Parenting Time

Yesterday, my post on this blog was called "Alimony – Back to Basics."  Just like with alimony, over the years, we have had dozens of posts on this blog about custody and parenting issues.  However, just like with alimony, there are statutory factors that the court, as well as the custody experts, must consider when… Continue Reading

Parent’s rights under the Hague Convention Upheld

Posted in Custody

An interesting case was recently decided by the United Supreme Court involving an international custody dispute, which has particular relevance for members of the military. For the case, click here. When there are allegations of parental kidnapping, or an unlawful removal of children to another country, there is an international treaty, known has the The Hague… Continue Reading

Alimony Modification – A Judge’s Checklist

Posted in Alimony, Child Support, Divorce, Interspousal Agreements, Modification, Practice Issues, Property Settlement Agreements

Most people are aware that a supporting spouse may be entitled to modify an alimony obligation upon a showing of “changed circumstances.” However, many people do not know that the “leg-work” that they have to do to set themselves up to succeed on such a Motion begins long before the parties ever go to Court,… Continue Reading

The Term and Amount of Limited Duration Alimony Can Really be Modified? …Really?

Posted in Alimony, Divorce, Property Settlement Agreements

As a continuation to my alimony-themed posts, the particular issue that is the subject of this blog post may come as a surprise to some supporting spouses; namely, the fact that the term and amount of a limited duration alimony obligation can be lengthened in some rare circumstances. New Jersey Courts do have authority to… Continue Reading

Motions to Reduce Support: When Applications are Denied without a Plenary Hearing, What’s Next?

Posted in Alimony, Child Support, Divorce, Modification, Practice Issues, Property Settlement Agreements

In this economy, you would be surprised to see how many judges are jaded by applications brought by supporting spouses to reduce their support obligations based upon a reduction in income. After all, some judges entertain these applications on their daily docket and oftentimes see supporting spouses who are simply attempting to capitalize on the… Continue Reading

Sloppy Drafting of Marital Settlement Agreements Can Cause Great Harm – Usually to only one of the parties

Posted in Equitable Distribution, Modification, Practice Issues

In a perfect world, marital settlement agreements (MSAs a/k/a Property Settlement Agreements) are crystal clear and cover every possible contingency under the sun (I say this as when first drafting this post, I was being contacted frantically by a client regarding custody provisions in the event of school closure because of hurricane.)  That perfect world rarely… Continue Reading

Another day, Another Judge lost

Posted in Mediation/Arbitration

 There is no secret that New Jersey is suffering a significant crisis with respect to judicial vacancies. This year alone has seen a significant number of retirements without replacements being named.  The effect on the family courts, and in particular, the divorce docket, has been catastrophic.   I was at a meeting of family lawyers… Continue Reading

SEEKING A SUPPORT MODIFICATION? FILE THAT CASE INFORMATION STATEMENT OR ELSE.

Posted in Modification

As we have blogged before, perhaps the most critical document in the New Jersey family law landscape is the Case Information Statement.  A document designed to provide the court, parties and legal counsel with a complete economic picture – income, expenses, assets and liabilities – the CIS, which is signed by the party under oath, can be used to address several… Continue Reading